Skip navigation

Phoenix

602-386-2728

Phoenix

602.386.2728

Menu
Goettl Air Conditioning Phoenix Blog

What Are Dual Fuel Systems and How Do They Work?

Heat pumps are one of the best systems available for home comfort on the market today. These systems can either heat or cool a home, and instead of burning fuel to do their job—like furnaces and boilers—they work through the system of heat exchange that moves heat from one place to another using only a modest amount of electricity. Heat pumps are fantastic ways to have year-round comfort in Arizona.

There is one disadvantage that heat pumps have, however, but through the use of a dual fuel system, they can overcome this. We’ll look into dual fuel AC systems in Tempe, AZ and what they can do for you. For a consultation to see if a heat pump is ideal for your home, either on its own or as a dual fuel system, call Goettl Good Guys Air Conditioning. We have many years of experience finding ways to cool and heat the Valley of the Sun.

How dual fuel hybrid systems maintain heat pump efficiency

Here is the main drawback of heat pumps: at extreme low temperatures, they will have trouble with maintaining their heating efficiency. Because a heat pump must remove heat from outside and bring it inside when in heating mode, the lower the outdoor temperature, the less heat is available for it to use. In most cool temperatures, this is not a problem—but when the thermometer drops below the economic balance point (which varies based on humidity), the heat pump will begin to experience troubles.

A dual fuel hybrid system combats this with a smaller backup heater that uses a different fuel source. Most backup heaters are natural gas furnaces, although propane furnaces are also common for homes that lack access to a natural gas pipeline. When the temperature reaches the economic balance point and the heat pump starts to lose efficiency, the backup heater automatically switches on and compensates for the loss of heat. As soon as the temperature rises back above the economic balance point, the backup heater shuts off.

Since heat pumps are known for their energy saving abilities in heating mode, a dual fuel system is an effective way to bump up a heat pump’s performance while only making a small extra sacrifice in costs. The backup system will only need to run occasionally, so it’s a less expensive option than having a full furnace or boiler rather than a heat pump.

Your home may not have the need for a hybrid system to assist the heat pump; to find out, call on the experts at Goettl Good Guys Air Conditioning.

We have many years of experience installing all kinds of heat pumps and dual fuel AC systems in Tempe, AZ, so you can trust that we will find the right solution for your home and family.

Comments are closed.